Life In The Maple City: A Tree City U.S.A.

Hello, fellow Goshenites!

I’m excited to share that April is going to be a month for celebrating trees. Each week, I will highlight an aspect of our trees that helps make our city “The Maple City.” Thanks to our urban forest, Goshen has been named a Tree City U.S.A. by the National Arbor Foundation for over two decades. Follow along with my posts to learn more about the magnificent plants around us and explore some ways the Goshen Guide can be used. All of this will be done in anticipation of Arbor Day on April 27th.

In preparation for this project, I met with Aaron Sawatsky-Kingsley, our city forester. Aaron is enthusastic about all trees but particularly the trees in Goshen. Whether it’s discussing scientific data or retelling stories, Aaron’s eyes light up when he talks about Goshen’s trees. He admires and appreciates our urban forest in a way I hope to help you all see in the following weeks. Trees make Goshen great, and if we can do it right, trees can continue to make Goshen great for generations to come.

Ken Horst and his granddaughter work on tree plantings together, and painted this sign seen on S. 16th Street.

Check back every Thursday in April for “Life in The Maple City!”

Check out the other Posts in this Series

Life in The Maple City: Looking Forward

Now that we know about the scientific data and history surrounding the trees of Goshen, it’s time to look at what we can do to help our urban forest thrive. With the tools of the Guide, we can read about so many different aspects of the urban forest, but we need to also take the time to put that knowledge into practice.

Life in The Maple City: A Historical Lens on Our Budding Forest

Looking around on campus I’m struck with the idea that others decades ago planted these huge trees. In Aaron Sawatsky-Kingsley’s Goshen News column, the Naturalized Mid-American, he often reflects on Goshen’s trees and their stories. In “A tree with a history tied to Kunderd gladiolus farm,” he describes the fruitful life of an elm tree over the past 50 years.

Life in The Maple City: Benefits of an Urban Forest

Welcome to the first installment of “Life in The Maple City!” Today I hope to give a brief overview of what the Goshen Guide has to offer us, and also dive into the perks that come along with an urban forest.

Life In The Maple City: A Tree City U.S.A.

I’m excited to share that April is going to be a month for celebrating trees. Each week, I will highlight an aspect of our trees that helps make our city “The Maple City.” Thanks to our urban forest, Goshen has been named a Tree City U.S.A. by the National Arbor Foundation for over two decades.

About The Author

Anna Shetler

Anna Shetler is a Goshen native finishing her final year at Goshen College. As an Interdisciplinary major with focuses in Biology, Chemistry, and Psychology, she has come to learn and love the various connections that can be made across disciplines. Anna is a intern at the Community Resilience Guild, helping to develop the Goshen Guide.

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